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Fall
2007

Room
Time
Instructor: Howard Rosenbaum
Office: 005B@SLIS
Office Hours:
L 033 5:45-8:30 PM M mail iconhrosenba@indiana.edu Telephone: 812 855 3250 4:00-5:30 PM M
11:30-1:00 PM T

Use this table to move through the syllabus:

Introduction Course Objectives Course Requirements Other Information Assignments
Grading Required Texts Topic Outline Assignments/Due Dates (short)

Use this link to return to the main syllabus page

people

Introduction

You have made an important decision in your lives and have chosen to spend the next year and a half to two years studying to complete a Masters of Information Science degree. During this time you will take a wide range of courses that are intended to prepare you to work in the information professions. Coursework in the MIS degree program covers information architecture, human-computer interaction, information retrieval, and strategic information management and leadership. Two basic themes run through these different domains of information science and form the underlying assumptions of the degree program and this course; these are a

  1. Socio-technical orientation to technology, and
  2. Focus on the people who design, implement, manage, and use technologies.

Considering the first of these themes, here at SLIS, we take a socio-technical approach to information and communication technologies (ICTs), meaning that technologies must always be considered in their social and organizational contexts. For example, it is clear that ICTs are assuming an increasingly important role in our work and social lives. Recent studies indicate that the private sector is highly wired and is now becoming wireless. According to the National Center for Education Statistics (2004),

Computers are widely used in the workplace. In 2003, 56 percent of all workers used computers on the job. More frequent use of computers was associated with higher levels of education and higher incomes. Forty percent of high school graduates and 16 percent of high school dropouts used computers at work compared to 82 to 87 percent of those with bachelorŐs, master's degrees, first-professional, or doctorŐs degrees. Among the common applications for all employees using computers on the job were: Internet and email (75 percent), word processing/desktop publishing (68 percent), spreadsheets and data bases (64 percent), and calendar/schedule (57 percent).

Most schools and public libraries have internet connectivity. Almost two-thirds of all American households have at least one computer and more than half have internet access. An increasing number of people are using multi-functional cell phones for voice communication and data exchange. According to Horrigan (2003), "28% of American adults are wireless ready" and, considering wireless-enabled laptops, "18% of Internet users said they had used such a device ... 29% of cell phone users said they had used a cell phone in the past month that can send and receive emails." What this means is that ICTs are quickly becoming routine informatin appliances in our lives. According to Rainie (2005),

On a typical day at the end of 2004, some 70 million American adults logged onto the internet to use email, get news, access government information, check out health and medical information, participate in auctions, book travel reservations, research their genealogy, gamble, seek out romantic partners and engage in countless other activities. That represents a 37% increase from the 52 million adults who were online on an average day in 2000 when the Pew Internet & American Life Project began its study of online life.

For many of us, work would not be possible (or would be much more difficult) without modern digital technologies. In addition, ICTs are becoming more integrated into the rest of our lives. Many people have adopted mobile communications devices, others routinely use wireless technologies and their laptops to do work and conduct business, and we are becoming increasingly immersed in what researchers call "pervasive computing." In fact, a recent study found that for many people, the internet is indispensabe (WebMetro, 2004):

Family members from 1,000 US households that took part in the "Internet Deprivation Study," conducted by Ipsos-Insight for Yahoo! and the advertising conglomerate OMD, found out that living without the Internet was far more difficult than they expected, 'and in some cases impossible, because the tools and services the Internet offers were firmly ingrained in their daily lives.'

Participants found that many daily activities were influenced and impaired, including booking travel, checking sports scores, communicating with friends and family and paying bills.

In a complementary quantitative study fielded by Conifer Research, which only had 28 participants, one-half of the respondents indicated they could not go without the Internet for more than two weeks and the median time respondents could go without being online is five days. Exactly 48% of the respondents indicated they could not go without the Internet for more than two weeks.

The second theme is that we are always concerned with the people who design, implement, and manage the ICTs and with the people who use them in their work and social lives. This is represented in our courses as a "person" or "user-centered" approach. The instances described above are part of a trend that is changing the way we, as individuals, interact with each other and our society. What is interesting at this moment is that we do not have a clear understanding of the types of changes that are taking place and how these changes are affecting us at work, at home, and out in the social world. There are researchers working in a variety of disciplines who are studying how ICTs work, the relationships between ICTs, the people who design, implement and use them, and the various social contexts in which they are used. One important discipline within which this type of work is being done is information science, and one important approach used in our discipline to study these issues is social informatics.

At SLIS, we assume that to design, implement, and manage ICTs and the systems of which they are a part, you should have a sound understanding of theoretical approaches to information, ICTs, and the complex organizations within which information systems and services operate. We also assume that this knowledge should be augmented by practical knowledge of the processes of ICT and systems development and use, and of the positive and negative outcomes that occur as people use real systems in real organizational and social settings. Therefore, this course provides a general introduction to information science as we practice it here at SLIS. In this course, you will learn about the intellectual disciplines that study information, where information science "fits" into this range, the relationships among information science and its cognate disciplines, and about the range of information professions for which you are preparing in this program. You will find out that information science is an interdisciplinary field that draws upon many other disciplines and covers all phases of the information life cycle. You will also develop a background in information science theory and research that will prepare you for the next courses that you will take in your MIS program.

Sources:

Horrigan, J. (2004). 28% of American adults are wireless ready: A PIP Data Memo. Pew Internet and American Life Project.

http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/127/report_display.asp

National Center for Education Statistics (2004). Digest of educational statistics, 2004. Ch. 7: Libraries and Educational Technology.

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d04/ch_7.asp

Rainie, L. (2005). Internet: The mainstreaming of online life. Pew Internet and American Life Project.

http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/Internet_Status_2005.pdf

WebMetro. (2004). My Kingdom for the Internet!

http://www.webmetro.com/news1detail1.asp?id=1101

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Course Objectives

At the end of this course, you will:

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Course Requirements

To receive a passing grade in this course, you must turn in all of the assignments and the term project and do your presentation. You cannot pass this course without doing all of the assigned work, however, turning in all of the work is not a guarantee that you will pass the course. Grades of <I> (Incomplete) may be assigned in this course after discussion with the instructor, but depending on the circumstances, there will be a penalty applied at the discretion of the instructor.

All papers and assignments must be submitted on the dates specified in this syllabus. If you cannot submit an assignment or cannot deliver a presentation on the date it is due, it is your responsibility to discuss your situation with the instructor, preferably in advance. Given that your reasons or problems are legitimate, arrangements for the completion of the outstanding work can be made; this will occur, however, at the discretion of the instructor.

There will be a penalty for work turned in after the assigned date, and this will also be applied at the discretion of the instructor.

Your written, web-based, and oral work will be evaluated according to four criteria; it must:

Borderline grades will be decided (up or down) on the basis of class contributions and participation throughout the semester.

Academic dishonesty

There is extensive documentation and discussion of the issue of academic dishonesty here in the Indiana University "Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct". Of particular relevance is the section on plagiarism:

3. Plagiarism

A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, words, or statements of another person without appropriate acknowledgment. A student must give credit to the originality of others and acknowledge an indebtedness whenever he or she does any of the following:

a. Quotes another person's actual words, either oral or written;

b. Paraphrases another person's words, either oral or written;

c. Uses another person's idea, opinion, or theory; or

d. Borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative material, unless the information is common knowledge.

From: http://www.dsa.indiana.edu/Code/index1.html

Plagiarism is the use of someone else's ideas, words, or opinions without attribution. Any assignment that contains plagiarized material or indicates any other form of academic dishonesty will receive a grade of F. A second instance will result in an automatic grade of F for the course. Penalties may be harsher depending upon the severity of the offense. See Indiana University's "Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct" (link above).

There is more to avoiding plagiarism than simply citing a reference. To aid students both in recognizing plagiarism and in avoiding the appearance of plagiarism, Indiana University's Writing Tutorial Services has prepared a short guide entitled "Plagiarism: what it is and how to recognize and avoid it". This guide is available here.

It provides explicit examples of plagiarism and offers strategies for avoiding it. Each student should be familiar with this document and use it as a guide when completing assignments.

Here are some strategies for avoiding plagiarism provided by Writing Tutorial Services at Indiana University:

  1. Put in quotations everything that comes directly from the text especially when taking notes.

  2. Paraphrase, but be sure you are not just rearranging or replacing a few words. Instead, read over what you want to paraphrase carefully; cover up the text with your hand, or close the text so you can't see any of it (and so aren't tempted to use the text as a "guide"). Write out the idea in your own words without peeking.

  3. Check your paraphrase against the original text to be sure you have not accidentally used the same phrases or words, and that the information is accurate.

From: http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml

Indiana University and School of Library and Information Science policies on academic dishonesty will be followed. Students found to be engaging in plagiarism, cheating, and other types of dishonesty will receive an F for the assignment and an additional penalty aapplied at the discretion of the instructor. As a rule of thumb, when in doubt, cite the source!

Grades at SLIS

The following definitions of letter grades have been defined by student and faculty members of the Committee on Improvement of Instruction and have been approved by the faculty (November 11,1996) as an aid in evaluation of academic performance and to assist students by giving them an understanding of the grading standards of the School of Library and Information Science:

Grade GPA Meaning
A 4.0 Outstanding achievement. Student performance demonstrates full command of he course materials and evinces a high level of originality and/or creativity that far surpasses course expectations
A- 3.7 Excellent achievement. Student performance demonstrates thorough knowledge of the course materials and exceeds course expectations by completing all requirements in a superior manner
B+ 3.3 Very good work. Student performance demonstrates above-average comprehension of the course materials and exceeds course expectations on all tasks as defined in the course syllabus
B 3.0 Good work. Student performance meets designated course expectations, demonstrates understanding of the course materials and is at an acceptable level
B- 2.7 Marginal work. Student performance demonstrates incomplete understanding of course materials.
C+
C
2.3
2.0
Unsatisfactory work. Student performance demonstrates incomplete and inadequate understanding of course materials
C-
D+
D
D-
1.7
1.3
1.0
.07
Unacceptable work. Course work performed at this level will not count toward the MLS or MIS degree. For the course to count towards the degree, the student must repeat the course with a passing grade.
F 0.0 Failing. Student may continue in program only with permission of the Dean.

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Other important information

There are three ways you can get in touch with me outside of class:

  1. My office is Room 005B in the School of Library and Information Science, Bloomington campus, and my office hours are 4:00-5:30 PM on Monday and 11:30-1:00 PM on Tuesday. I can also meet with you by appointment if these hours are not convenient.
  2. My office phone number at SLIS is 812-855-3250. I have voice mail, so you can always leave me a message.
  3. My email address is hrosenba@indiana.edu. I will check the mail at least twice daily and will respond to messages when I read them. This is a good way to for you to communicate with me privately.

There is a class list, called hrosenba_infosoc, to which we will all be subscribed. By sending an email message to hrosenba_infosoc@listserv.indiana.edu, you can communicate with everyone else simultaneously. To subscribe to the list, send your email address to hrosenba@indiana.edu

Use your preferred email address for this list. I will close it so that only subscribers can post, so we should not be hit with any spam.

I will use the mailing list to send messages to the class; typically, these will be clarifications of questions about assignments and other important information, such as when I must alter or cancel office hours. I'll also send interesting postings that cross my desktop from time to time. You will use the list to ask questions of and discuss issues with your colleagues as the semester progresses.

I suggest that you check your e-mail every day!

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Calendar
Assignments

Select any of the topics here
for a detailed description of the assignment --->
Critical reviews of articles Investigations of MIS careers
IT application essays Wiki commentary


You will have four assignments in this class. For two of these assignments, you will work with a group. You will do two assignments on your own. These assignments are described below, and will be discussed in greater detail in class.

-> GROUP ASSIGNMENTS <-

By Friday, August 31, you will be randomly divided into a group of no more than five people. At this time, you will receive email with the names and email addresses of your fellow group members. You should contact each other and have at least introduced yourselves by class on Monday, September 3. You will work with this group for the rest of the semester on the following two assignments.

CRITICAL REVIEWS OF ARTICLES

This assignment is worth 35% of final grade, 10% for each review and 5% for your group's participation in the discussion of these articles.

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INVESTIGATION OF MIS CAREERS

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-> INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENTS <-

IT APPLICATION ESSAYS

Return to Assignments list

WIKI COMMENTARY

Return to Assignments list

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Grading

This table shows the assignments you have to do and the number of points each is worth towards the final grade.

Assignment Value Number % of the final grade
Critical reviews of articles
Discussion of artcles in class
10%

5%

3 35%
Investigation of MIS careers
Presentation
15%

5%

1 20%
IT application essays 15% 2 30%
Wiki commentary 10% 2 10%
Class participation 5%
5%


NOTE

5% of the overall grade that has been allocated for class participation. For the purposes of this class, participation is defined as contributing to class discussion or demonstrating in other ways that you are making an effort to succeed in this class. In addition, as a professional, you will be expected to articulate your ideas in both written and oral form, therefore it is important that you think critically and present your ideas throughout the duration of the class.

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Book

Required texts

There are no required texts for this course. Readings are on the web or will be made available in the SLIS Library

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Topic Outline, Reading Schedule and Assignment Due Dates

Select any date and see:

  • the topics that will be covered;
  • the readings that have been assigned;

  • the assignments that will be discussed; and
  • the assignments that are due in that class.

Schedule of classes

Select any date
to see readings,
assignments,
and due dates
August 27 September 3 September 10 September 17 September 24
October 1 October 8 October 15 October 22 October 29
November 5 November 12 November 19 November 26 December 3

The URL for the ereserve readings is http://ereserves.indiana.edu/coursepage.asp?cid=2804

The password is ******

NOTE: The URLs for the readings were last checked on August 26, 2007


August 27

Introduction: Information science and the MIS

Assignments

All assignments discussed in class

Receive group assignments (August 31)

Return to Schedule of classes


September 3

What is information science?

Topics:

A brief history of information science
What is information science?
Basic concepts
    Information, representation, theoretical approaches

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on the nature of information science can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called what-is-is.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Bates, M. (2006). Fundamental forms of information. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57(8), 1033 - 1045.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/112593518/ABSTRACT

Buckland, M. (1991). Information as thing. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 42, 351-360.

http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/~buckland/thing.html

Hjorland, B. (2007). Information: Objective Subjective/Situational?. Journal of the American Society for Information Science. 58(10), 1448-1456

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/114278626/ABSTRACT

Talja, S., Tuominen, K., Savolainen, R. (2006). "Isms" in information science: constructivism, collectivism and constructionism. Journal of Documentation, 61,(1), 79-102.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1465009

Zins, C. (2007). Conceptions of information science. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 58(3). 335-350

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/114030860/ABSTRACT

Recommended Readings

Bates, M.J. (1999). The invisible substrate of information science. Journal of the American Society for Information Science. 50(12). 1043-1050.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/69500826/ABSTRACT

Debons, A. (2000). Information science: Forty years of teaching. ISECON 2000

http://isedj.org/isecon/2000/412/ISECON.2000.Debons.pdf

Zins, C. (2006). Redefining information science: from "information science" to "knowledge science". Journal of Documentation, 62(4), 447-461.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1563476

Assignments:

Meet with group to rank tracks

Send ranking to instructor (September 4)

Group is assigned to a track (September 7)

Return to Schedule of classes


September 10

Information architecture

Topics

What is Information architecture?
Basic concepts and principles
    Organization and ontologies
    Hypertext
    Navigation and labeling

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on an introduction to information architecture can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called ia_intro.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Clerwall, C. (2003). Information architecture: A descriptive overview. In: Pettersson, J.S. (ed.) HumanIT 2003. Karlstad University Studies, Karlstad University. 93-110

http://www.humanit.org/pdf/HumanIT_2003_Ch6_Clerwall.pdf

Dillon, A. (2002). Information architecture in JASIST: Just where did we come from?. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53(10), 821-823.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/93520804/ABSTRACT

Evernden, R. and Evernden. E. (2003). Third-generation information architecture. Communications of the ACM, 46(3), 95-98

http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=636777&coll=portal&dl=ACM&CFID=1145871&CFTOKEN=10611780

Ding, Y. and Foo, S. (2002). Ontology research and development. Part 1 - a review of ontology generation Journal of Information Science, 28(2), 123-136

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/28/2/123

Walker, J. (2005). Feral hypertext: when hypertext literature escapes control Proceedings of the sixteenth ACM conference on Hypertext and hypermedia. 46-53.

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1083356.1083366

Recommended Readings

Morville, P. (2003).International Information Architecture. Semantic Studios.

http://semanticstudios.com/publications/semantics/000012.php

Assignments

If you are writing IT application essay #1, email the URL of the site you intend to review to the instructor.

Receive confirmation of your site (September 12)

Return to Schedule of classes


September 17

Information architecture continued

Topics

Designing information architecture
    Information spaces
    Information interaction
Information architecture careers

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on information architecture practice can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called ia_practice.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Dillon, A. (2000) Spatial semantics and individual differences in the perception of shape in information space. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 51,6, 521-528.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/71001473/ABSTRACT

Garrett, J.J. (2003). The elements of user experience: User-centered design for the web (pp. 6-36 and 160-173 only). Boston, MA: New Riders.

Haverty, M. (2002). Information architecture without internal theory: An inductive design process. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53(10), 839-845.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/93520094/ABSTRACT

Toms, E.G. (2002). Information interaction: Providing a framework for information architecture. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53(10), 855-862.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/93520866/ABSTRACT

Toub, S. (2000). Evaluating information architecture: A practical guide to assessing web site organization. Argus Associates.

http://argus-acia.com/white_papers/evaluating_ia.pdf

Recommended Readings:

Travis, I.L. (2000). Information Architecture Practice: An Introduction. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 26(6). [Read all five interviews that follow]

http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Aug-00/index.html

Assignments

Submit job titles to instructor

Receive confirmation from instructor (September 19)

Return to Schedule of classes


September 24

Human computer interaction

Topics:

What is HCI?
Basic concepts and principles
    Usability
    Contextual design
    Visualization

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on an introduction to human computer interaction can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called hci_intro.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Borner, K., Feng, Y, and McMahon, T. (2002). Collaborative Visual Interfaces to Digital Libraries In Marchionini, G. & Hersh, W. (eds), Second ACM+IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries, July 14-18, Portland, Oregon, USA, ACM Press, 279-280

http://ella.slis.indiana.edu/~katy/paper/dl02-CIV.pdf

Dray, S. and Siegel, D. (2004). Remote possibilities?: international usability testing at a distance. Interactions. 11(2). 10-17

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/971258.971264

Hepworth, M. (2007). Knowledge of information behaviour and its relevance to the design of people-centred information products and services. Journal of Documentation, 63(1), 33

http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=4&did=1198411021&SrchMode=3&sid=2&Fmt=2&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1188184505&clientId=12010&aid=1

Sauro, J. (2004). Premium usability: Getting the discount without paying the price. Interactions 11(4), 30-37

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1005261.1005276

Tsakonas, G. (2007). Analysing and evaluating usefulness and usability in electronic information services. Journal of Information Science, 32(5), 400-419

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/32/5/400

Recommended Readings:

Blandford, A., Keith, S., Connell, I., Edwards, H. (2004). Analytical usability evaluation for digital libraries: A case study. Proceedings of the 2004 Joint ACM/IEEE Conference on Digital Libraries. 27-36

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/996350.996360

Gershon, N.; Eick, S.G., and Card, S. (1998). Information visualization. Interactions, 5(2).

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/274430.274432

Herrmann, T., Kunau, G., Loser, K-U., Menold, N. (2003). Socio-technical walkthrough: designing technology along work processes. Proceedings of the Eighth Conference on Participatory design: Artful Integration: Interweaving Media, Materials and Practices - Volume 1. 132-141

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1011870.1011886

Irestig, M., Eriksson, H., Timpka, T. (2003). Methodological considerations: The impact of participation in information system design: a comparison of contextual placements. Proceedings of the Eighth Conference on Participatory design: Artful integration: Interweaving Media, Materials and Practices - Volume 1. 132-141

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1011870.1011883

Return to Schedule of classes


October 1

Human-computer interaction continued

Topics:
A new agenda for HCI
HCI careers

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on the practice of information architecture can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called hci_practice.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Clemmensen, T (2006). Whatever happened to the psychology of human-computer interaction?: A biography of the life of a psychological framework within a HCI journal. Information Technology & People , 19,(2), 151-165.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1558833

Kantner, L., Sova, D.H., Rosenbaum, S. (2003). Field studies: Alternative methods for field usability research. Proceedings of the 21st Annual International Conference on Documentation. 68-72.

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/944868.944883

McNeese, M.D. (2003). New visions of human-computer interaction: making affect compute. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 59(1-2)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1071-5819(03)00059-4

Rogers, Y. and Muller, H. (2006). A framework for designing sensor-based interactions to promote exploration and reflection in play. IInternational Journal of Human-Computer Studies. 64(1), 1-14.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhcs.2005.05.0048

Westbrook, L. (2006). Mental models: a theoretical overview and preliminary study Journal of Information Science, 32(6), 563-579

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/32/6/563

Recommended Readings:

DePaula, R. (2003). A new era in human computer interaction: the challenges of technology as a social proxy. Proceedings of the Latin American Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 219-222

http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=944543&coll=ACM&dl=ACM&CFID=26492297&CFTOKEN=33096192

Martin, D. and Sommerville, I. (2004). Patterns of cooperative interaction: Linking ethnomethodology and design. ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 11(1), 59-89

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/972648.972651

Return to Schedule of classes


October 8

Information retrieval

Topics
What is Information Retrieval?
Basic concepts and principles
    Theories of IR
    Evaluation IR systems

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on an introduction to information retrieval can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called ir_intro.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Buckland, M. (1999). Vocabulary as a central concept in library and information science. In Arpanac, T. et al. (Eds.), Digital libraries: Interdisciplinary concepts, challenges, and opportunities. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science [CoLIS3], May 23-26, 1999, Dubrovnik, Croatia, (pp 3-12). Zagreb: Lokve.

http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/~buckland/colisvoc.htm

Baeza-Yates, R. amd Ribeiro-Neto, B. (1999). Modern Information Retrieval: Chapter 1: Introduction Addison-Wesley-Longman Publishing Co.

http://www.ischool.berkeley.edu/~hearst/irbook/1/chap01.html

Cleverdon, C.W. (1991). The Cranfield tests on index languages. Proceedings of the 14th annual international ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval.

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/122860.122861

Hider, P. (2006). Search goal revision in models of information retrieval. Journal of Information Science, 32(4), 352-361

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/32/4/352

Savolainen, R. and Kari, J. (2006). User-defined relevance criteria in web searching. Journal of Documentation, 62(6), 685

http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=5&did=1255208951&SrchMode=3&sid=3&Fmt=2&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1188184879&clientId=12010&aid=1

Recommended Readings:

Sparck Jones, K., & Willett, P. (1997). Overall introduction (pp. 1-4). History (pp. 9-13). Key concepts (pp. 85-91), Models (pp. 257-261), Evaluation (pp. 167-174). Readings in Information. Retrieval. San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.

Assignments

Essay #1 due (October 12)

If you are writing IT application essay #2, email the URLs of the search engines you wish to compare to the instructor

Receive confirmation of your choices (October 10)

Return to Schedule of classes


October 15

Information retrieval continued

Topics
Digital libraries
Filtering
Semantic web
Searching
IR careers

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on information retrieval practice can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called ir_practice.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Berners-Lee, T., Hendler, J., & Lassila, O. (2001, May 17). The Semantic Web. Scientific American, 501.

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=00048144-10D2-1C70-84A9809EC588EF21

Jansen, B.J. and Molina, P.R. (2006). The effectiveness of Web search engines for retrieving relevant ecommerce links. Information Processing & Management, 42,(4), 1075-1098.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ipm.2005.09.003

Mostafa, J. (2005). Seeking better web searches. Scientific American. January 24.

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=0006304A-37F4-11E8-B7F483414B7F0000

Reih, S.Y. (2004). On the Web at home: Information seeking and Web searching in the home environment. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 55(8), 743-753.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/107628782/PDFSTART

Resnick, M.L. and Vaughan, M. (2006). Best Practices and Future Visions for Search User Interfaces. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 57(6), 781-787

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/112457863/ABSTRACT

Recommended Readings:

Bishop, A.P. Mehra, B., Bazzell, I., and Smith, C. (2000). Socially Grounded User Studies in Digital Library Development. First Monday. 5(6).

http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_6/bishop

Marshall, C.C. and Shipman, F.M. (2003). Which semantic web?. Proceedings of the Fourteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, 57-66

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/900051.900063

Return to Schedule of classes


October 22

NOTE: No class today - Instructor is attending the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Assignments

Begin wiki commentaries

Return to Schedule of classes


October 29

Social informatics and information science

Topics:
What is social informatics?
What is organizational informatics?
Basic concepts and principles
    Sociotechnical approaches to ICTs
    IT and social change
    Information ecologies

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on social informatics and information science can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called what-is-si.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Berg, E., Mšrtberg, C., and Jansson, M. (2005). Emphasizing technology: socio-technical implications. Information Technology & People , 18,(4), 35.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1529352

Davenport, E. (2005) Social Informatics in Practice: A Guide for the Perplexed. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 31(5)

http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Jun-05/davenport.html

Lamb, R. and Sawyer, S. (2005). On extending social informatics from a rich legacy of networks and conceptual resources. Information Technology & People, 18,(1), 9-20.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1464566

Rosenbaum, H. (2007). Social Informatics Preprint to appear in the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science.

http://www.slis.indiana.edu/hrosenba/www/Papers/si_07.pdf

Sawyer, S. and Huang, H. (2007). Conceptualizing information, technology, and people: Comparing information science and information systems literatures. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 58(10). 1436 - 1447

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/114276282/ABSTRACT

Recommended Readings:

Kling, R. (2000). Learning about information technologies and social change: The contribution of social informatics. The Information Society, 16(3), 217-232

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=3533085&site=ehost-live

Nardi, B.A. and O'Dell, V.L. (1999). Information Ecologies: Using Technology With Heart. Ch. 4: Information Ecologies. First Monday. 4(5).

http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue4_5/nardi_chapter4.html

Sawyer, S. (2005). Social Informatics: Overview, Principles and Opportunities. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 31(5)

http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Jun-05/sawyer.html

Return to Schedule of classes


November 5

Strategic information management and leadership

Topics:
What is SIML?
Basic concepts and principles
    Managing
    Leadership
    Project management

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on an introduction to strategic information management and leadership can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called siml_intro.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Chen, M.Y. and Chen, A.P. (2006). Knowledge management performance evaluation: a decade review from 1995 to 2004 Journal of Information Science, 32(1), 17-38

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/32/1/17

Gillard, S. and Johansen, J. (2004). Project Management Communication: a Systems Approach Journal of Information Science, 30(1), 23-29

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/30/1/23

Leana, C.R. (2000). Stability and change as simultaneous experiences in organizational life. Academy of Management Review, 25(4), pp. 753-760.

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=3707707&site=ehost-live

Piccolo, R.F. and Colquitt. (2006). Transformational leadership and job behaviors: The mediating role of core job characteristics. Academy of Management Journal, 49(2), 327-340.

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=20786079&site=ehost-live

Thamhain, H.J. (2004). Team leadership effectiveness in technology-based project environments. Project Management Journal, 35(4), p35-46.

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=15523865&site=ehost-live

Recommended Readings:

Chidambaram, Laku, Tung, L.L (2003). Is Out of Sight, Out of Mind? An Empirical Study of Social Loafing in Technology-Supported Groups. Information Systems Research, 16(2), 149-168

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=17527654&site=ehost-live

Frank, F.D. and Taylor, C.R. (2004). Talent management: Trends that will shape the future. Human Resource Planning, 27(1), 33-41.

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=13598971&site=ehost-live

Assignments:

Essay #2 due (November 9)

If you are writing IT application essay #3, email a brief description of the system you wish to investigate to the instructor

Receive confirmation from instructor (November 7)

Return to Schedule of classes


November 12

SIML continued

Topics:
IT, work, and communication
    Communities of practice
    Strategic intelligence
    Knowledge management
    IT and organizations; learning from failure
SIML careers

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on strategic information management and leadership practice can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called siml_practice.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Cox, A. (2005). What are communities of practice? A comparative review of four seminal works Journal of Information Science, 31(6), 527-540

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/31/6/527

Hara, N. and Schwen, T. (2006). Communities of Practice in Workplaces: Learning as a Naturally Occurring Event preprint or an article accepted for publication in Performance Improvement Quarterly

http://ella.slis.indiana.edu/~nhara/paper/CoPdef_preprint.pdf

Herschel, R.T. and Jones, N.E. (2006). Knowledge management and business intelligence: the importance of integration Journal of Knowledge Management. 9(4), 45-55

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1509670

Huang, J., Makoju, E., Newell, S., Galliers, R.D. (2003). Opportunities to learn from 'failure' with electronic commerce: a case study of electronic banking. Journal of Information Technology, 18(1) 17-26

http://konstanza.ingentaselect.com/vl=11479952/cl=42/nw=1/rpsv/cw/routledg/02683962/v18n1/s2/p17

Hughes, J.A., O'Brien, J., Rouncefield, M., & Tolmie, P. (1998). Some "real" problems of "virtual" teamwork. Lancaster, England: Authors

http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fss/sociology/ papers/hughes-et-al-problems-of-teamwork.pdf

Recommended Readings:

Cronin, B. (2000). Strategic intelligence and networked business. Journal of Information Science, 26(3), 133-138.

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/26/3/133

Wegner, E. (2000). Communities of practice and social learning systems. Organization. 7(2), 225-246.

http://org.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/7/2/225

Assignments:

Group career presentation times assigned

Return to Schedule of classes


November 19

IT, communication, and social networks

Topics:
Social networks and IT use
Social capital
Socio-technical interaction networks

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on IT, social networks, and communication can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called it_soc-nets.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Balkundi, P. and Kilduff, M. (2006). The ties that lead: A social network approach to leadership.. Leadership Quarterly, 17(4), 419-439

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6W5N-4HDG9HG-2&_user=1105409&_coverDate=12%2F31%2F2005&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000051666&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1105409&md5=b5b14f8310166bf51716d6606aeb0916

Fleming, L. and Marx, M. (2006). Managing Creativity in Small Worlds California Management Review, 48(4), 6-27

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=21923216&site=ehost-live

Gillam, C. and Oppenheim, C. (2006). Review Article: Reviewing the impact of virtual teams in the information age Journal of Information Science, 32(2), 160-175

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/32/2/160

Lor, P.J. (2007). Is a knowledge society possible without freedom of access to information? Journal of Information Science, 33(4), 387-397

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/33/4/387

Shachaf, P. and Hara, N. (2007). Behavioral complexity theory of media selection: a proposed theory for global virtual teams Journal of Information Science, 33(1). 63-75

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/33/1/63

Recommended Readings:

Kling, R., McKim, G., and King, A. (2003). A bit more to IT: Scholarly communication forums as socio-technical interaction networks. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 54(1), 47-67.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jissue/102521784

Labianca, G. and Brass, D.J. (2006). Exploring the social ledger: Negative relationships and negative asymmetry in social networks in organizations. Academmy of Management Review, 31(3), 596-614

http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=buh&AN=21318920&site=ehost-live

Rodden, T., Rogers, Y., Halloran, J., and Taylor, I. (2003). Designing novel interactional workspaces to support face to face consultations. Proceedings of CHI'03 conference on computer human interaction (pp. 57-64). New York: ACM Press.

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/642611.642623

Wellman, B. (2001). Computer networks as social networks. Science, 293(5537), 2031-2034.

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/reprint/293/5537/2031

Return to Schedule of classes


November 26

Ethics and IT careers

Topics:
What is the study of ethics?
What are major ethical positions?
Ethics and computing

The PowerPoint overheads for the presentation on information and IT ethics can be downloaded as a single file. The link is at the bottom of this page. The file, called ethics.ppt was created with PowerPoint X for Mac and can be viewed with the PowerPoint viewer.

If you want to print the overheads, you should select <Handouts (6 to a page)> to save paper. You should also select the option <Pure Black & White> so that colors will be printed in black and white.

Readings:

Albrechtslund, A. (2007). Ethics and technology design. Ethics and Information Technology, 9(1), 63-73.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/4p712u7664t49254/

Beghtol, C. (2004). Ethical decision-making for knowledge representation and organization systems for global use. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 56(9), 903-912

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/110471102/PDFSTART

McDonald. M. (2001). A Framework for Ethical Decision-Making: Version 6.0. Ethics Shareware

http://www.ethics.ubc.ca/people/mcdonald/decisions.htm

Poulton, M.S. (2005). Organizational storytelling, ethics and morality: How stories frame limits of behavior in organizations. Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies. 10(2), 4-10

http://ejbo.jyu.fi/pdf/ejbo_vol10_no2_pages_4-9.pdf

Winston, M. (2007). Ethical leadership and ethical decision making: A meta-analysis of research related to ethics education Library & Information Science Research, 29(2), 230-251

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=PublicationURL&_tockey=%23TOC%236577%232007%23999709997%23661328%23FLA%23&_cdi=6577&_pubType=J&_auth=y&_acct=C000051666&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1105409&md5=a78567ca4a758b9498cab4e1db944db7

Recommended Readings:

Chow, W.S. and Choi, K.Y. (2003). Identifying managers who need ethics training in using IT at work Behaviour & Information Technology, 22(2), 117-125

http://www.metapress.com/content/b1epw46cwqvejy6a/fulltext.pdf

Newton, K.S., Wingreen, S.C., and Blanton, J.E. (2004). The impact of organizational ethical climate fit on information technology professional's job satisfaction and organizational commitment research in progress. Proceedings of the 2004 SIGMIS Conference on Computer Personnel Research: Careers, Culture, and Ethics in a Networked Environment, 35-38

http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/982372.982380

Peterson, D.K. (2003). Computer ethics: the influence of guidelines and universal moral beliefs. Information Technology & People, 15,(4), 346-361.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=883573

Assignments:

Group MIS career presentations

Wiki commentaries completed Friday, November 30

Return to Schedule of classes


December 3

Conclusions and presentations

Assignments:

Group MIS career presentations

NOTE: All of the presentations are online. The page is here and will open in a new window.

Essay #3 due

Return to Schedule of classes


Return to table

Melting watch

Assignments and Due Dates: Short Version

This table shows the assignments you have to do, the dates that they will be discussed in class, other important dates, the percentage each is worth towards the final grade, and the dates the assignments are due.

Assignment/Project Value Date Due
Critical reviews of articles 35% Various times
Discussed in class
Receive group assignments

August 27
August 31
Investigation of MIS careers 20% November 26, December 3
Discussed in class
Meet with group to rank tracks
Send rankings to instructor
Assigned to a track
Submit job titles to instructor
Receive confirmation from instructor
Receive presentation time

August 27
September 3
September 4
September 7
September 17
September 19
November 12
IT application essays 30% October 12, November 9, December 3
Discussed in class
Essay #1: Web site review
    Email URL of site to instructor
    Receive confirmation
Essay #2: Search engine comparison
    Email URLs of search engines to instructor
    Receive confirmation
Essay #3: Information systems evaluation
    Email description of system to instructor
    Receive confirmation

August 27
October 12
    September 10
    September 12
November 9
    October 8
    October 10
December 3
    November 5
    November 7
Wiki commentary 10% Beginning October 22, finished November 30
Discussed in class

August 27
Class participation 5% Throughout

NOTE There is a small portion of the overall grade (5%) that has been allocated for class participation. For the purposes of this class, participation is defined as contributing to class discussion or demonstrating in other ways that you are making an effort to succeed in this class. In addition, as a professional, you will be expected to articulate your ideas in both written and oral form, therefore it is important that you think critically and present your ideas throughout the duration of the class.

Return to table


Page by Howard Rosenbaum
Find me at hrosenba@indiana.edu http://www.slis.indiana.edu/hrosenba/www/L577/syll/S510_syll6.html